Skip to main content

Project by Project Hosts Seventh Annual Tasting Benefit - Plate by Plate


PLATE BY PLATE
Hosted by Project by Project to Benefit the Asian Pacific Islander Small Business Program (API SBP)

On Saturday, August 1, 2009, from 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm, Project by Project will be hosting the Seventh Annual Tasting Benefit called Plate by Plate in Los Angeles, California in the Wallis Annenberg Building at the California Science Center.

All net proceeds from the admission and auction purchases of the event will benefit the
Asian Pacific Islander Small Business Program to help the organization strengthen its foundation and mission to assist the development of Asian and Pacific Islander small and micro businesses in Los Angeles, especially those of low income immigrants of Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Thai, and Filipino communities.

Over 30 chefs of New American, international, and fusion restaurants join with vintners, brewers, and distillers from around the world to bring guests a night of food, drinks, and fun.

There will also be celebrities, live entertainment, a silent auction for attendees to bid on the unique experiences from exclusive cooking lesson, special dining package, airline tickets to chic products.

The event lasts from 7 PM – 10 PM and runs $150 per person. If you buy 5-10 tickets, you can receive a $20 discount on each ticket. VIP tickets run $275 apiece and include an exclusive tasting with chef José Andrés and Sagatiba.

Featured Restaurants:

Mo-Chica
BottleRock Downtown
XIV by Michael Mina
Mendocino Farms and Scoops.
Cicada
Roy's
Katsuya
Bon Appetit at the Getty Center,
Wabi-Sabi
Citizen Smith
Michael Cordon Bleu
Jamaica's Cakes
The Bazaar by Jose Andres
Bashan,
Michel Cordon Bleu
Sno:LA Yogurt
XOORO
Vanille de Patisserie
Sweet Temptation Co
Good Girl Dinette
Park on 6th and many more.

Plate by Plate
Saturday, August 1 , 2009 from 7-9 pm
Wallis Annenberg Building at the California Science Center
700 State Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90037

Tickets can be purchased for Plate by Plate by clicking here!


1 comment

Popular posts from this blog

Quinoa Soup

It took me nearly ten years to see Bolivia again. In my mind, I built up Bolivia to be this magical place where not only my childhood took place, but a place untouched by the evilness of industrialization, mass production, and globalization.

(Lomas de Arena: Sand Dunes, Santa Cruz, Bolivia)
Of course, a lot of things have changed.

(La Paz, Bolivia)
When I lived in Bolivia, I barely left my city, Santa Cruz. The cuisine of the altiplano (or the high altitude regions) is pretty different from the cuisine of the lowlands. La Paz, the capital, is dry, cold in the shade, hot in the sun, and you're basically living amongst the clouds. People here eat a lot more quinoa than they do in Santa Cruz. Most of the quinoa comes from the altiplano because quinoa is hardy and it can grow in high altitudes. The andes are the perfect place for quinoa to grow. During our trip to La Paz and the Salar de Uyuni, we had a lot of quinoa soup and cooked quinoa instead of rice. European backpackers rejoic…

Cuñape

"Cuñape" is the best cheeseballs in the world, and it’s from Santa Cruz, Bolivia. These gooey and addictive cheese balls are similar to the Brazilian "pão de queijo" or the French "gougères" or the Colombian "pandebono" but all of these are different from each other as well. Gougères are lighter and more airy while the Brazilian ones are chewier but drier on the outside. I would say the pandebonos are closest in taste and texture to the Bolivian cuñape but it is slight more bready.

In Bolivia, we use mennonite cheese (farmer's cheese) for this recipe and honestly without that cheese it will never be exactly like the original but you do what you can. I've been hunting down a similar cheese in the U.S. for ages but the closest I can get to it is to use the queso blanco or fresco and add some more salt (or even mix some feta into it).

The history of the cuñape is very interesting. It is a Guaraní word that means "a woman's breast&…

Hangari Bajirak Kalgooksoo (or kalguksu)

My Korean friend and I came here a bit early to avoid the lunch rush and I'm so glad we did. By the time we were finished, there was a grip of Koreans waiting to eat. This is one of the best kept secrets of Koreatown right now and most people still haven't quite jumped on the Kalgooksoo bandwagon yet but they will once they have a taste of this doughy hand pulled noodles set in a delicious seafood heavy broth. 

Bajirak means clams and so I ordered the restaurant namesake's noodle dish (written out as "Manila Clam Kalguksu - $9.95 as of this writing) while my friend ordered the Spicy Seafood Kalguksu ($9.95 as of this writing). We also ordered a side of steamed dumplings (was a bit extraneous at $7.95 as of this writing).

My Manila Clam Kalguksu came out piping hot. The steam that rose from it engulfed my senses and I could smell all the wonderful sea creatures that died for me to enjoy their umami flavors. One stir into my noodles and I could see how the noodles were …